Information for Doctors

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Thoracic Medicine

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Sleep Medicine

Latest News

Researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center and elsewhere, using a mouse model, have recorded the activity of individual nerve cells in a small part of the brain that works as a "switchboard," directing signals coming from the outside world or internal memories. Because human brain disorders such as schizophrenia, autism and post-traumatic stress disorder typically show disturbances in that switchboard, the investigators say the work suggests new strategies in understanding and treating them.

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The death rate from asthma in Australia has fallen by almost 70 per cent since the 1980s, according to a new report released by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare

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Office workers with more natural light exposure at the office have longer sleep duration, sleep quality, more physical activity and better quality of life than counterparts with less light exposure.

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People who do shift work may have a higher risk of diabetes, even those who eventually return to a daytime work schedule, a new study suggests. Researchers from the University of Pittsburgh found that any amount of shift work, whether it's just a few years or an entire lifetime's worth, is linked with a higher risk of diabetes.

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Patients with serious heart and lung conditions don't have the normal range of facial expressions, particularly the ability to register surprise in response to emotional cues, finds preliminary research. This finding could be used to help busy emergency care doctors decide whom to prioritize for treatment, and gauge who really needs often costly and invasive tests, suggest the researchers.

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A new study finds that sleep deprivation affects facial features such as the eyes, mouth and skin, and these features function as cues of sleep loss to other people.

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Bronchoscopy

What is Bronchoscopy?

A bronchoscopy involves the use of a flexible fibreoptic (video) scope to examine the main airways of your lungs.  The bronchoscope will be inserted into your lungs through your mouth, however you will be given sedatives and anesthetic so you will not feel a thing.  A bronchoscopy allows your doctor to examine any abnormalities in your airways and collect specimens if required.  The procedure usually takes 10-20 minutes.

WHy is the test performed?

A bronchoscopy can be performed for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes.  Common reasons to perform a bronchoscopy are to determine if you have inflammation, infection or abnormalities such as tumors or foreign bodies inside your lungs.
Therapeutic reasons for performing a bronchoscopy include removing fluid or mucus plugs, remove foreign objects, treat a cancer, wash out the airway or widen an airway that has been blocked or narrowed.

Advanced Airway Procedures

In more complex clinical situations, we can provide advanced procedural services such as:

  • Laser photocoagulation, electrocauterization or argon plasma coagulation of exophytic tumors, granulation tissue or benign lesions.
  • Laser resection of benign tracheal and bronchial strictures.
  • Stent insertion to palliate extrinsic compression of the tracheobronchial lumen from either malignant or benign disease processes.


how should i prepare for my bronchoscopy?

NIL BY MOUTH 8 hours before the procedure – this means no food, fluid, water or smoking. If you are a diabetic check with your doctor, special precautions may need to be taken.

Check with you doctor about any medications you usually take and whether you should take these as normal before the procedure or not. Warfarin and Aspirin should be ceased 5 days prior to your procedure.  Please discuss this with your doctor.  

If you have any x-rays or scans, bring these with you.

Arrange for someone to pick you up after the procedure as it is advised that you don’t drive or catch public transport alone following sedation.
 
AFTER THE PROCEDURE

You will be sleepy for approximately 30 minutes after the procedure.  You will be taken to the recovery area to rest until the effects of the sedation have worn off and your normal reflexes have returned.  It is not uncommon to cough and bring up blood stained sputum afterwards.  Occasionally patients develop a fever several hours after the procedure – this can be treated with paracetamol.  If this does not settle down, please call your doctor’s office.

Will I feel anything during MY bronchoscopy?

No.  When you arrive you will be given local anesthetic spray to your throat.  This numbs the throat reducing any discomfort during the bronchoscopy.  You may also be given a sedative injection, but will not be completely ‘sent to sleep’ as you might for a major operation.

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