Information for Doctors

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Thoracic Medicine

Think you might have a breathing disorder or just looking for more information?

Sleep Medicine

Latest News

They light up our screens, perform live shows all over the world, and amaze us with their skills out on the court and in the field. It’s hard to believe that some of the most famous entertainers in the world have to deal with sleep disorders like anyone else.
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Mobile Phone/TV/Laptop -  any device with a screen sends out blue wavelengths of light, which can tamper with the natural release of sleep-promoting hormone melatonin. 

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Bioresorbable splints used for just second time ever, successfully improved breathing so baby can go home for the first time.

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TSGQ's very own senior sleep scientist Jade Pittard answers the publics questions regarding sleep and how to achieve it in a recent radio segment with 612 ABC presenter Katrina Davidson.

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The system that allows the sharing of genetic material between bacteria – and therefore the spread of antibiotic resistance – has been uncovered by a team of scientists from UCL and Birkbeck, University of London.

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Dreaming may be the conscious awareness of underlying processes of offline learning and memory consolidation where the integration of this occurs during sleep.

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Bronchoscopy

What is Bronchoscopy?

A bronchoscopy involves the use of a flexible fibreoptic (video) scope to examine the main airways of your lungs.  The bronchoscope will be inserted into your lungs through your mouth, however you will be given sedatives and anesthetic so you will not feel a thing.  A bronchoscopy allows your doctor to examine any abnormalities in your airways and collect specimens if required.  The procedure usually takes 10-20 minutes.

WHy is the test performed?

A bronchoscopy can be performed for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes.  Common reasons to perform a bronchoscopy are to determine if you have inflammation, infection or abnormalities such as tumors or foreign bodies inside your lungs.
Therapeutic reasons for performing a bronchoscopy include removing fluid or mucus plugs, remove foreign objects, treat a cancer, wash out the airway or widen an airway that has been blocked or narrowed.

Advanced Airway Procedures

In more complex clinical situations, we can provide advanced procedural services such as:

  • Laser photocoagulation, electrocauterization or argon plasma coagulation of exophytic tumors, granulation tissue or benign lesions.
  • Laser resection of benign tracheal and bronchial strictures.
  • Stent insertion to palliate extrinsic compression of the tracheobronchial lumen from either malignant or benign disease processes.


how should i prepare for my bronchoscopy?

NIL BY MOUTH 8 hours before the procedure – this means no food, fluid, water or smoking. If you are a diabetic check with your doctor, special precautions may need to be taken.

Check with you doctor about any medications you usually take and whether you should take these as normal before the procedure or not. Warfarin and Aspirin should be ceased 5 days prior to your procedure.  Please discuss this with your doctor.  

If you have any x-rays or scans, bring these with you.

Arrange for someone to pick you up after the procedure as it is advised that you don’t drive or catch public transport alone following sedation.
 
AFTER THE PROCEDURE

You will be sleepy for approximately 30 minutes after the procedure.  You will be taken to the recovery area to rest until the effects of the sedation have worn off and your normal reflexes have returned.  It is not uncommon to cough and bring up blood stained sputum afterwards.  Occasionally patients develop a fever several hours after the procedure – this can be treated with paracetamol.  If this does not settle down, please call your doctor’s office.

Will I feel anything during MY bronchoscopy?

No.  When you arrive you will be given local anesthetic spray to your throat.  This numbs the throat reducing any discomfort during the bronchoscopy.  You may also be given a sedative injection, but will not be completely ‘sent to sleep’ as you might for a major operation.

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