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Thoracic Medicine

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Sleep Medicine

Latest News

In what may be the largest study of sleep problems among individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS), researchers at UC Davis have found that widely undiagnosed sleep disorders may be at the root of the most common and disabling symptom of the disease: fatigue. Study paticipant reports of sleep disorder frequency, sleep patterns and complaints of excessive daytime sleepiness suggest that sleep problems may be a hidden epidemic in the MS population.

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A sleep-promoting circuit located deep in the primitive brainstem has revealed how we fall into deep sleep. Discovered by researchers at Harvard School of Medicine and the University of Buffalo School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, this is only the second "sleep node" identified in the mammalian brain whose activity appears to be both necessary and sufficient to produce deep sleep.  Using designer genes, researchers were able to 'turn on' specific neurons in the brainstem that result in deep sleep.

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Insomnia can cause chronic inflammation, which can lead to weight gain, hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, and earlier death. This study finds that curing the insomnia reduces the inflammation and hopefully reduces disease. It also found the best way to cure lack of sleep is through the use of a common psychotherapy treatment - cognitive behavioural therapy.

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Getting enough sleep is important to people of any age, but it is especially so for teenagers, with insufficient sleep possibly being linked to obesity as an adult.

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A study is shining new light on a sleep disorder called “sleep drunkenness.” The disorder may be as prevalent as affecting one in every seven people. Sleep drunkenness disorder involves confusion or inappropriate behaviour, such as answering the phone instead of turning off the alarm, during or following arousals from sleep, either during the first part of the night or in the morning. An episode, often triggered by a forced awakening, may even cause violent behaviour during sleep or amnesia of the episode.

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Ever wondered about the effects of binge sleeping? Are naps bad or how long should you nap for? For all these myths debunked follow the link

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Atypical Mycobacterium

What is Atypical Mycobacterium Infection?

Mycobacteria is a type of bacteria that can cause infection within the body.  Atypical mycobacterium is any mycobacterium other than Tuberculosis mycobacterium.  The most common form of atypical mycobacterium, which also most commonly affects the lungs is the mycobacterium avium intracellulare complex.  Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) has been isolated in freshwater and saltwater worldwide, with other common sources including aerosolized water, piper hot water systems, bathrooms, house dust, soil, birds, farm animals and cigarette components such as tobacco, filters and paper.  

What is MAC?

Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) consists of two species— M avium and M intracellular -these species are difficult to differentiate.   It is thought that MAC is acquired by exposure to soil, air, or water, especially in temperate and sub tropical areas. People who are affected are usually those with low immune systems (patients with AIDS), or those suffering from chronic lung conditions (bronchiectasis, heavy smoking, or cystic fibrosis)  MAC causes 2 general patterns of lung disease, one pattern involves nodules and cavities, whilst the other involves nodules and bronchietasis.

How is MAC transmitted?

MAC is transmitted into the body through inhalation via the respiratory tract or digestion via the GI tract.  There is no known human to human transmission therefore the mycobacterium avium intracellular complex is considered NOT contagious.

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Treatment

Medication

Treatment can involve a range of drugs but often includes Rifampicin, Ethambutol and Clarithromycin.


Exercise

Regular daily exercise including walking, Yoga, Pilates, and strength training is highly recommended. MAC patients must remember that effort is required to maintain exercise due to chronic and sometimes extreme fatigue. It is very easy to become tired and not feel up to exercising. However, the continued plan will eventually contribute to improving daily quality of life.


Diet

Proper nutrition and adequate caloric intake to prevent weight loss and even encourage weight gain is helpful for MAC patients. Regular rest periods and sleep patterns assist to lessen fatigue. There may be some benefit for regular counseling visits and taking prescribed medications for depression and anxiety due to the stress of chronic illness. MAC patients can help themselves by maintaining a proactive stance and keeping up to date regarding current knowledge about the disease.


Seek Help

A major issue with MAC disease is fatigue or tiredness. Routines may need to be altered and assistance with activities of daily living may be required. Enlistment of others’ help and support is essential.


Keep on top of it!

Patients must pay attention to symptoms, take medications indefinitely, exercise regularly, and provide good nourishment to maintain a healthy weight. It is essential to envelope rigorous pulmonary hygiene, providing sputum cultures or getting bronchoscopes as needed. It is also important to avoid exposure to known infections, rest periodically as needed, and promote good sleep patterns. It is possible to maintain a good quality of life by following these suggestions.

MAC lung patients are initially treated for 15-18 months. Monthly follow up visits are recommended that include blood work. Less frequent testing is done via sputum samples, CT scans, chest films, and pulmonary function studies about every 6 months. Bronchoscopy may be required for those patients unable to produce sputum samples for culture.
Patients whose sputum remains culture positive for MAC after 12 months of drug treatment are considered treatment failures. Patients whose sputum cultures become negative for MAC almost always do so within 6 months of starting their drugs. If the condition worsens with symptoms or if the tests appear to change, then the physician would need to reevaluate the treatment plan and possibly consider another regimen of antibiotic therapy.

Lady Windermere Syndrome.

Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) has also been associated with pulmonary infection and bronchiectasis in middle-aged women without a preexisting lung disease. Pulmonary MAC infection in this population is believed to be due to voluntary cough suppression that results in stagnation of secretions, which creates a suitable environment for growth of the organisms.

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