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Thoracic Medicine

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Sleep Medicine

Latest News

Researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center and elsewhere, using a mouse model, have recorded the activity of individual nerve cells in a small part of the brain that works as a "switchboard," directing signals coming from the outside world or internal memories. Because human brain disorders such as schizophrenia, autism and post-traumatic stress disorder typically show disturbances in that switchboard, the investigators say the work suggests new strategies in understanding and treating them.

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The death rate from asthma in Australia has fallen by almost 70 per cent since the 1980s, according to a new report released by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare

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Office workers with more natural light exposure at the office have longer sleep duration, sleep quality, more physical activity and better quality of life than counterparts with less light exposure.

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People who do shift work may have a higher risk of diabetes, even those who eventually return to a daytime work schedule, a new study suggests. Researchers from the University of Pittsburgh found that any amount of shift work, whether it's just a few years or an entire lifetime's worth, is linked with a higher risk of diabetes.

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Patients with serious heart and lung conditions don't have the normal range of facial expressions, particularly the ability to register surprise in response to emotional cues, finds preliminary research. This finding could be used to help busy emergency care doctors decide whom to prioritize for treatment, and gauge who really needs often costly and invasive tests, suggest the researchers.

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A new study finds that sleep deprivation affects facial features such as the eyes, mouth and skin, and these features function as cues of sleep loss to other people.

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Do I Have A Sleep Disorder?

The Epworth Sleepiness Scale

sleep disorder

The Epworth Sleepiness Scale is a way of finding out how sleepy someone is during the day, and was first devised by Dr Murray Johns in Australia and published in 1991.

It is now used internationally by sleep clinics, research groups and sleep physicians.

Epworth Sleepiness Score (ESS)

Below is the ESS, get a pen and paper and write out your score for each of the questions below. Then add your total score up out of 24.

0 – No chance of falling asleep
1 – Slight chance of falling asleep
2 – Moderate chance of falling asleep
3 – High chance of falling asleep

Sitting and Reading 0 1 2 3
Watching TV 0 1 2 3
Sitting inactive in a public place 0 1 2 3
As a passenger in a car for an hour without a break 0 1 2 3
Lying down in the afternoon when circumstances permit 0 1 2 3
Sitting and talking to someone 0 1 2 3
Sitting quietly after lunch without alcohol 0 1 2 3
 In a car while stopped in traffic for a few minutes 0 1 2 3

If your total score was more than 5, you have mild sleepiness and may not be getting the proper sleep you need.

If your score is 10 or more you should talk to your doctor about how to improve your daytime energy levels and alertness.

Take your score to your doctor and talk about whether you might require a diagnostic sleep study.

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