Information for Doctors

Are you a DOCTOR looking for more details about our practice?

Thoracic Medicine

Think you might have a breathing disorder or just looking for more information?

Sleep Medicine

Latest News

Sleep apnoea may make it hard for you to remember simple things, such as where you parked your car or left your house keys, a small study suggests.

Read more...
 

Researchers believe that disrupted circadian clocks are the reason that shift workers experience higher incidences of type 2 diabetes, obesity and cancer. The body's primary circadian clock, which regulates sleep and eating, is in the brain. But other body tissues also have circadian clocks, including the liver, which regulates blood glucose levels.

Read more...
 

In recent research is has been found that disruption to rapid eye-movement (REM) sleep caused by sleep apnoea, may affect an individual’s capacity to form new spatial memories.

Read more...
 

Office workers with more light exposure at work had longer sleep duration, better sleep quality, more physical activity and better quality of life compared to office workers with less light exposure in the workplace.

Read more...
 

Can you be sleep deprived without knowing it? Sleep is not always prioritised however the implications can be devastating. Even one night sleep deprived can be impacting your body on a variety of different levels; physically and psychologically. The only way to know if you are getting consolidated sleep is to monitor with specialised equipment what is happening when you are asleep.

Read more...
 

In what may be the largest study of sleep problems among individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS), researchers at UC Davis have found that widely undiagnosed sleep disorders may be at the root of the most common and disabling symptom of the disease: fatigue. Study paticipant reports of sleep disorder frequency, sleep patterns and complaints of excessive daytime sleepiness suggest that sleep problems may be a hidden epidemic in the MS population.

Read more...

TSGQ Sleep Diary

This sleep diary should be completed during the two weeks immediately prior to a multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) or a maintenance of wakefulness test (MWT). The diary consists of fourteen 24 hour graphs.  Please bring the completed diary with you when you attend the overnight study before your MSLT or MWT.

At bedtime, just before turning out the lights, record the following daily activities using the appropriate symbols at the appropriate time (Note: MN - midnight; MD – midday)

F Food
C Caffeine one “C” for each cup of tea, coffee or Coke
A Alcohol one “A” for each glass
NB Beginning of nap
NE End of nap
M Medication (ie: sleeping pill, sedative, regular medication)
Time you turned out lights to go to sleep

After your final morning wakening, but before getting out of bed, record the following:

  • Draw a thick line over the times you were asleep overnight.  Leave gaps for any time you were awake.
  • Mark the time at which you finally awoke and did not return to sleep with the appropriate symbol:
S Woke spontaneously
AL Woken by alarm or other stimuli
Time you actually got out of bed
  • In column A, estimate the time (in minutes) that it took to fall asleep after lights out
  • In column B, estimate the total amount of time spent awake (if at all) during the night (AFTER initially falling asleep and BEFORE finally waking)
  • Use the comments section below the sleep graphs to note any events which may affect your sleep

Download Sleep Diary (114kb)

© copyright 2010 | All Rights Reserved | Web Design Brisbane by iFactory