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Sleep Medicine

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New research confirms that sleep disturbances are linked to pain and depression, but not disability, among patients with osteoarthritis (OA).  Results from a new study found that poor sleep increases depression and disability, but does not worsen pain over time.

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Older women with disordered breathing during sleep were found to be at greater risk of decline in the ability to perform daily activities, such as grocery shopping and meal preparation, according to a new study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the University of California, San Francisco.

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People with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnoea may have an intrinsic inability to burn high amounts of oxygen during strenuous aerobic exercise, according to a new study led by researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine.

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This webinar will be a clinical presentation in assessing a child who presents with snoring. Snoring is a very common presentation in childhood with some studies suggesting that up to 30% of children will snore at some point in their life. Within those that snore, there will be some who have obstructive sleep apnoea.

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Sleep apnoea may make it hard for you to remember simple things, such as where you parked your car or left your house keys, a small study suggests.

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Researchers believe that disrupted circadian clocks are the reason that shift workers experience higher incidences of type 2 diabetes, obesity and cancer. The body's primary circadian clock, which regulates sleep and eating, is in the brain. But other body tissues also have circadian clocks, including the liver, which regulates blood glucose levels.

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TSGQ Sleep Diary

This sleep diary should be completed during the two weeks immediately prior to a multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) or a maintenance of wakefulness test (MWT). The diary consists of fourteen 24 hour graphs.  Please bring the completed diary with you when you attend the overnight study before your MSLT or MWT.

At bedtime, just before turning out the lights, record the following daily activities using the appropriate symbols at the appropriate time (Note: MN - midnight; MD – midday)

F Food
C Caffeine one “C” for each cup of tea, coffee or Coke
A Alcohol one “A” for each glass
NB Beginning of nap
NE End of nap
M Medication (ie: sleeping pill, sedative, regular medication)
Time you turned out lights to go to sleep

After your final morning wakening, but before getting out of bed, record the following:

  • Draw a thick line over the times you were asleep overnight.  Leave gaps for any time you were awake.
  • Mark the time at which you finally awoke and did not return to sleep with the appropriate symbol:
S Woke spontaneously
AL Woken by alarm or other stimuli
Time you actually got out of bed
  • In column A, estimate the time (in minutes) that it took to fall asleep after lights out
  • In column B, estimate the total amount of time spent awake (if at all) during the night (AFTER initially falling asleep and BEFORE finally waking)
  • Use the comments section below the sleep graphs to note any events which may affect your sleep

Download Sleep Diary (114kb)

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