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Sleep Medicine

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Long the stuff of science fiction, the disembodied 'brain in a jar' is providing science fact for researchers, who by studying the whole brains of fruit flies are discovering the inner mechanisms of jet lag.  Researchers present the first real-time imaging of intact circadian neural networks and demonstrate how light shifts disrupt biological clocks.

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Popular non-prescription and prescription medications, including the active ingredient in Benadryl, have been linked to increased risk of developing dementia by a study published in a top-tier medical journal.

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“WHEN SLEEP IS SOUND, HEALTH AND HAPPINESS ABOUND” is the slogan for World Sleep Day 2015 taking place worldwide on March 13th, 2015. Sound sleep is a treasured function and one of the pillars of health, along with a balanced diet and adequate exercise. When sleep fails, health declines. Poor sleep and bad health decrease the quality of life and take happiness away.

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TSGQ registered nurse and polysomnographic technician Travis Bell joined 612 ABC radio presenter Kelly Higgins-Devine to discuss sleep disorders on 2nd February 2015.

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Scientists have found that that activation of cholinergic neurons - those that release the neurotransmitter acetylcholine -- in two brain stem structures can induce REM sleep in an animal model. Better understanding of mechanisms that control different sleep states is essential to improved treatment of sleep disorders.

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Going to bed early could help individuals avoid repetitive negative thinking, according to a recent study. According to the authors, repetitive negative thinking is "defined as an abstract, perseverative, negative focus on one's problems and experiences that is difficult to control."

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Link between obstructive sleep apnea and increased bone resorption in men

A recent Japanese study is first evidence of a link between obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and abnormal bone metabolism, due to the effects of hypoxia, microinflammation and oxidative stress.

osabones1

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a prevalent disorder and should be considered a systemic illness.

Studies have shown that the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) are elevated in patients with OSA independently of obesity and that visceral fat.

OSA in obese patients is now considered manifestations of the Metabolic Syndrome, include:

  • obesity without OSA is associated with daytime sleepiness;
  • PCOS and diabetes type 2 are independently associated with EDS after controlling for SDB, obesity, and age;
  • increased prevalence of OSA in post-menopausal women, with hormonal replacement therapy associated with a significantly reduced risk for OSA;
  • lack of effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in obese patients with apnea on hypercytokinemia and insulin resistance indices; and
  • the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in the US population from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1988-1994) parallels the prevalence of symptomatic OSA in general random samples. Finally, the beneficial effect of a cytokine antagonist on EDS in obese, male apneics and that of exercise on SDB in a general random sample, supports the hypothesis that cytokines and insulin resistance are mediators of EDS and sleep apnea in humans.

 Hypoxia, micro-inflammation and oxidative stress are also known to affect bone metabolism.

osabones2

Model for mediation of effects of E on osteoclast formation and function by cytokines in bone marrow microenvironment.

The bone metabolic abnormalities in patients with OSA were studied, specifically the serum/ urinary levels of bone resorption markers and their attenuation following CPAP therapy in subjects with OSA.

The study was a cross-sectional and prospective study and was conducted in 50 consecutive male subjects visiting a sleep clinic and 15 age-matched control subjects without OSA. Plasma concentrations of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-alfa, 3-nitrotyrosine, osteocalcin, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP), and urinary concentrations of cross-linked C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX) were examined before and after 3 months' CPAP in subjects with OSA.

 The results showed that the plasma levels of the cytokines as well as the urinary CTX levels were higher in subjects with severe OSA than in those with mild OSA or control subjects. Significant decrease of the urinary excretion of CTX (before: 211±107 vs. after: 128±59 μg/mmol/creatinine; p<0.01) as well as of the plasma levels of the cytokines was observed following 3 months' CPAP.

Overall this study found that increased OSA severity correlates with the serum/ urinary levels of bone resorption markers and there is reversal following CPAP in subjects with OSA.

More information on Bone Metabolism

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